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A corpse posed in a life tableau as a fireman. Looking at the picture more closely reveals that his eyes are distinctly rolled into the back of his head.

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The Ghosts of World War II by Sergey Larenkov

Taking old World War II photos, Russian photographer Sergey Larenkov carefully photoshops them over more recent shots to make the past come alive. Not only do we get to experience places like Berlin, Prague, and Vienna in ways we could have never imagined, more importantly, we are able to appreciate our shared history in a whole new and unbelievably meaningful way.

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“City of Shadows” was taken during the winter of the collapse of the Soviet Union by Alexey Titarenko

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there are times when i look at people and i see nothing worth liking.

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The Execution of Aileen Wuornos
Highway prostitute Aileen Carol Wuornos, known as the “Damsel of Death” for the seven slayings she is believed to committed, was executed by lethal injection on October 9, 2002 at the Florida State Prison. The 46-year-old serial killer was pronounced dead at 9:47 a.m. 6 minutes after the injection process began.She was executed for the 1989 killing of Palm Harbour, Fla., electrician Harry Mallory, but has confessed to five others and was a suspect in a seventh. Mallory’s trial was held in Daytona Beach. “We did wake her up at 5:30. She requested a towel and washcloth to wash her face and freshen up,” said prison spokesman Sterling Ivy before the execution. “She was very calm this morning. Not as talkative as she has been in the past.” Wuornos declined the traditional last meal, which could have been anything she wanted for under $20, and instead was given a cup of coffee.A half-dozen anti-death penalty demonstrators were outside the prison, but were outnumbered by corrections officers. Wuornos was strapped to a gurney and hooked to two intravenous lines. Thirty-two witnesses watched as she was wheeled into the death chamber where an executioner pumped deadly chemicals into her system. “We can testify that that lethal injection is certainly more of a humane way to terminate life than the electric chair,” said State Attorney John Tanner, who prosecuted the case in Daytona Beach. “She expressed in her last psychiatric examination relief that the electric chair had been abolished in the state of Florida.”Wuornos went to her death willingly. She fired her attorneys and opposed appeals made on her behalf. Two appeals were turned down by the Florida Supreme Court Tuesday. They both contended Wuornos was insane and not competent enough for her execution. In her final statement, Wuornos said: “Yes, I would just like to say I’m sailing with the rock, and I’ll be back, like Independence Day with Jesus. June 6, like the movie. Big mother ship and all, I’ll be back, I’ll be back.” She had written the Florida Supreme Court last year to say she “would prefer to cut to the chase and get on with the execution. Taxpayers’ money has been squandered and the families have suffered enough.”

The Execution of Aileen Wuornos


Highway prostitute Aileen Carol Wuornos, known as the “Damsel of Death” for the seven slayings she is believed to committed, was executed by lethal injection on October 9, 2002 at the Florida State Prison. The 46-year-old serial killer was pronounced dead at 9:47 a.m. 6 minutes after the injection process began.

She was executed for the 1989 killing of Palm Harbour, Fla., electrician Harry Mallory, but has confessed to five others and was a suspect in a seventh. Mallory’s trial was held in Daytona Beach. “We did wake her up at 5:30. She requested a towel and washcloth to wash her face and freshen up,” said prison spokesman Sterling Ivy before the execution. “She was very calm this morning. Not as talkative as she has been in the past.” Wuornos declined the traditional last meal, which could have been anything she wanted for under $20, and instead was given a cup of coffee.

A half-dozen anti-death penalty demonstrators were outside the prison, but were outnumbered by corrections officers. Wuornos was strapped to a gurney and hooked to two intravenous lines. Thirty-two witnesses watched as she was wheeled into the death chamber where an executioner pumped deadly chemicals into her system. “We can testify that that lethal injection is certainly more of a humane way to terminate life than the electric chair,” said State Attorney John Tanner, who prosecuted the case in Daytona Beach. “She expressed in her last psychiatric examination relief that the electric chair had been abolished in the state of Florida.”

Wuornos went to her death willingly. She fired her attorneys and opposed appeals made on her behalf. Two appeals were turned down by the Florida Supreme Court Tuesday. They both contended Wuornos was insane and not competent enough for her execution. In her final statement, Wuornos said: “Yes, I would just like to say I’m sailing with the rock, and I’ll be back, like Independence Day with Jesus. June 6, like the movie. Big mother ship and all, I’ll be back, I’ll be back.” She had written the Florida Supreme Court last year to say she “would prefer to cut to the chase and get on with the execution. Taxpayers’ money has been squandered and the families have suffered enough.”

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